Apologetics Overkill

i love math

If you ever need a fresh reminder for the urgency of real theology, I give you this:

“The Mathematical Proof for Christianity is Irrefutable”

Here is the opening:

It is impossible that Christianity is not God’s revelation of truth to man. Simply impossible. The math proves it beyond question. It doesn’t take faith to believe that one plus one equals two, and it doesn’t take faith to identify the religion which has mathematical certainty in its corner.

This is from the same guy who gave us:

“Faith Isn’t Needed to Recognize Biblical Authority”

In both articles, Pastor Delzell happily informs us that reason alone — uninformed by faith — can prove Christianity. So, I’m not exactly clear on what faith does, since faith is not necessary to get us to the divinity and authority of Christ.

I am also curious as to whether Delzell has actually talked to a non-Christian and tried this stuff? Or to a Jew? I also see that he is a Lutheran pastor. I am not a Lutheran, but I am doubtful that Luther would be impressed by these brazen declarations that faith is not necessary to affirm the Christian faith.

 

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10 comments

  1. This is exactly the kind of apologetics that gets the bad kind of atheists (i.e. those who pity people with faith and feel utterly superior to them instead of respecting one another) drooling in pleasure, Kant and Kierkgaard spin in their own graves “like a cat in a tumble-dryer” (quote) and 99% of people with some self respect bury their faces in a pillow/their own hands feeling ashamed for mankind.

    Not to speak about the fact that he approves of conveniently hand picking some Scripture passages as absolute proof, and ignores, I don’t know… Romans 1:17, being a Lutheran and stuff (as you pointed out in the last sentence)

  2. Even when I was in middle school I thought “Wait a minute, does this argument really work? Isn’t it already assuming what it wants to definitively prove about the Bible?”

    Plus, a lot of the OT passages aren’t exactly “prophecies” in the sense that apologists want them to be.

    • Also, how does this math actually work? I mean, how do you calculate the odds of being “betrayed by a friend” or “spat on and struck”? And the probability of being born of a virgin…

      • Yeah, in the comments section at CP, another person made a similar point about how the math is applied. The comments are really interesting to read — the last I saw, the large majority of commentators were critical…from Christians, not just the usual skeptics. So, that’s a good sign, that even evangelicals aren’t buying it.

        And, yes, you are right about the OT prophecies. He clearly pulled this from some outdated apologetics manual. Also, he is basically saying that Jews are total idiots.

  3. I think, ultimately, this man has no understanding of the human person. The faith that saves us is the kind of thing that made a Roman Centurion cross over the Rubicon. He didn’t do the math, he put himself, heart and soul, to the cause of Caesar.

    Another Centurion did not do the math when he shouted, “This man indeed is the son of god!”

    • Maybe Pastor Delzell would say that the centurion could have done the math, but he chose faith instead. So, there are two ways to God: faith and math! Take your pick.

      Seriously, I would like to read Delzell tell us the purpose of faith. How does he define faith? I suspect that he has not carefully thought through all of this, yet CP finds him qualified to be one of their “exclusive columnists”!

      • Well, I doubt the centurion had read the Old Testament. So I guess math is for those who are smart enough (or culturally situated) to know the prophecies, and faith is for those less enlightened!

      • Yep, that’s why the Jews must be really dense to not see such obvious mathematical certitude!

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